Raspberry Leaf

Drug Levels and Effects:




Summary of Use during Lactation:


Red raspberry (Rubus idaeus) leaf is a purported galactogogue;[1][2][3] however, no scientifically valid clinical trials support this use. Galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiablefactorsthat affect milk production.[4] It is generally without side effects when used as a tea, but no data are available on the safety in nursing mothers or their infants.

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Drug Levels:


Maternal Levels.

Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Infant Levels.

Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.


Effects in Breastfed Infants:


Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.


Possible Effects on Lactation:


Sixty-six postpartum mothers (22 in each of 3 groups) with no concurrent illnesses were randomly assigned to receive an herbal tea, placebo, or nothing after delivering healthy, full-term infants. Mothers in the herbal tea group received at least 3 cups daily of 200 mL of Still Tea (Humana-Istanbul, Turkey; containing hibiscus 2.6 grams, fennel extract 200 mg, fennel oil 20 mg, roobios 200 mg, verbena [vervain] 200 mg, raspberry leaves 200 mg, fenugreek 100 mg, goat's rue 100 mg, and, vitamin C 500 mg per 100 grams, per manufacturer's web site November 2011). A similar-looking apple tea was used as the placebo. All women were followed by the same nurse and pediatrician who were blinded to what treatment the mothers received. Mothers who received the Still Tea produced more breastmilk with an electric breast pump on the third day postpartum than mothers in the other groups. The infants in the Still Tea group had a lower maximum weight loss, and they regained their birth weights sooner than those in the placebo or no treatment arms. No long-term outcome data were collected. Because many of the ingredients in Still Tea are purported galactogogues, including raspberry leaf, no single ingredient can be considered solely responsible for the tea's effects, although the authors attributed the action to fenugreek.[5]


References:


1. Hardy ML. Women's health series: herbs of special interest to women. J Am Pharm Assoc (Wash). 2000;40:234-42 . PMID:10730024
2. Petrie KA, Peck MR. Alternative medicine in maternity care. Prim Care. 2000;27:117-36. PMID:10739460
3. Westfall RE. Galactagogue herbs: a qualitative study and review. Can J Midwifery Res Practice. 2003;2:22-7.
4. The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine Protocol Committee. ABM clinical protocol #9: use of galactogogues in initiating or augmenting the rate of maternal milk secretion (First revision January 2011). Breastfeed Med. 2011;6:41-9. PMID:21332371
5. Turkyilmaz C, Onal E, Hirfanoglu IM et al. The effect of galactagogue herbal tea on breast milk production and short-term catch-up of birth weight in the first week of life. J Altern Complement Med. 2011;17:139-42. PMID:21261516



Substance Identification:




Substance Name:

Raspberry Leaf

Scientific Name:

Rubus idaeus

CAS Registry Number:

84929-76-0

Drug Class:


  • Complementary Therapies

  • Galactogogues

  • Phytotherapy

  • Plants, Medicinal


  • Administrative Information:




    LactMed Record Number:


    876


    Last Revision Date:


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